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HealthyLungsUSA.com provides medical information on Asthma, COPD, Pneumonia, Sleep Apnea, Seasonal Flu and Lung Disease and Disorders. We have a huge selection of Pulse Oximeters, Nebulizers, Oxygen Concentrators and CPAPs and more…


Our goal is to provide a convenient website for general medical information, product reviews and home medical equipment needs. Particularly with a focus on respiratory health.

HealthyLungsUSA.com

We are a medical information, product review and medical equipment website.  Our team of technicians and clinical staff strive to provide the latest medical news and equipment to assist your respiratory needs and more.  We want to help you get the best equipment suited for your needs, at a great price..

HealthyLungsUSA.com provides medical information on Asthma, COPD, Pneumonia, Sleep Apnea, Seasonal Flu and Lung Disease and Disorders. We have a huge selection of Pulse Oximeters, Nebulizers, Oxygen Concentrators and CPAPs and more…
We are a medical information, product review and medical equipment website.  Our team of technicians and clinical staff strive to provide the latest medical news and equipment to assist your respiratory needs and more.  We want to help you get the best equipment suited for your needs, at a great price..
Our goal is to provide a convenient website for general medical information, product reviews and home medical equipment needs. Particularly with a focus on respiratory health.
Disclaimer: “HealthyLungsUSA.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, as well as other affiliate programs. An affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com and other affiliate networks. By the way this does not in any way increase the cost to the consumer or buyer.”

Types of Lung Disease

Obstructive lung disease

Obstructive lung disease, also called COPD or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, affects the airways and air sacs (alveoli) of the lungs. The airways narrow or become blocked, decreasing the amount of air exhaled out of the lungs. People with obstructive lung disease may feel like they are trying to breathe out through a straw. Over time, the lungs may get bigger because the air gets trapped. Symptoms of COPD include shortness of breath, chest tightness, increased mucus, wheezing and coughing. Treatments may include medicines, inhalers, oxygen use, breathing retraining, exercise (pulmonary rehab), surgery or lung transplant.

Obstructive lung diseases include:

  • Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency – an air sac disease passed down through families that may cause lung and liver disease. People with this disease can develop severe emphysema as early as 45 yrs. Old.
  • Asthma – lung irritants and allergens cause the airways to swell, narrow and tighten.
  • Bronchiectasis – damage, scarring and widening of the large airways caused by recurring swelling or infection of the airways. People with this disease are at risk for frequent lung infections.
  • Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome – damaged and inflamed airways from chemical particles, lung infections or inflammation in lung transplant patients. This leads to scarring that blocks the airways in the lungs
  • Chronic bronchitis – frequent infections that cause inflamed airways, increased mucus, shortness of breath, wheezing and chest tightness. Treatment may include antibiotics, steroids and oxygen use.
  • Chronic bronchitis means that you have had these episodes a few times a year for 2 years or more. The main cause of chronic bronchitis is smoking.
  • Cystic fibrosis – a disease passed down through families that causes thick, sticky mucus to build up in the lungs, digestive tract and other areas of the body.
  • Emphysema – the air sacs lose their elasticity and become overinflated. This causes air trapping, shortness of breath and a decrease in gas exchange. The main cause of emphysema is smoking..

Restrictive lung disease

Restrictive lung disease, also called interstitial lung disease, may affect lung tissue by causing scarring, inflammation (swelling) or thickening of lung tissue. This makes the lungs unable to expand fully. It becomes hard for the lungs to take in oxygen and release carbon monoxide. Oxygen and carbon dioxide molecules have a hard time passing through the lung tissue to enter or exit the blood stream. Other conditions, such as obesity and scoliosis or side curve to the spine, may also prevent the lungs from expanding fully and be considered a restrictive lung disease. Symptoms of restrictive lung disease include shortness of breath, fatigue especially with activity, chest tightening and increased mucus. Treatments may include medicines to decrease swelling or the progression of the disease, breathing retraining, exercise, oxygen use, surgery or lung transplant.
Restrictive lung diseases include:
  • Autoimmune connective tissue disorders may affect the connective tissue in the body and the lungs, causing inflammation, swelling, hardening and scarring.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis – a disorder that causes inflammation of the body’s joints because of increased immune cell production. About 1 in 10 people with rheumatoid arthritis develop restrictive lung disease. Scarring of the lungs occurs from the body’s overactive immune system attacking the lungs.
  • Scleroderma – immune cells produce more collagen, causing the body’s skin to harden or scar. One type of scleroderma, called systemic sclerosis, can cause hardening or scarring in many parts of the body, including the lungs.
  • SjÖgren’s syndrome – autoimmune disease of unknown cause that causes dryness of the eyes, mouth and other body parts. Pulmonary symptoms act like interstitial lung disease, causing swelling and inflammation.
  • Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (BOOP) / Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) – a rare condition where the small airways (bronchioles) and air sacs (alveoli) become inflamed and blocked with connective tissue.
  • Hypersensitivity pneumonitis – a disease that causes inflammation of the alveoli in the lungs due to an allergic reaction to dust, fungus, molds or chemicals. Exposure comes most often from the person’s occupation or hobbies. The disease causes symptoms that are similar to the flu.
  • Bird fancier’s lung / pigeon breeder’s disease – from inhaling bird feathers or droppings.
  • Farmer’s lung – from inhaling mold that grows on hay, straw or grain.
  • Pneumoconiosis – a disease caused by inhaling workplace dust. The disease causes coughing and shortness of breath. It may lead to pulmonary fibrosis.
  • Asbestosis – from inhaling asbestos fibers.
  • Black lung disease – from inhaling coal dust (coal miners).
  • Siderosis – from inhaling iron from mines or welding fumes.
  • Silicosis – from inhaling silica dust.
  • Pulmonary fibrosis – lung tissue becomes scarred overtime, making it hard to breathe. Scarring may occur from the environment, chemotherapy, radiation, certain medicines, autoimmune disease or unknown cause.
  • Sarcoidosis – disease of unknown cause where abnormal growths, called granulomas, grow in the tissue of the lungs, skin or lymph nodes, causing inflammation. The disease may progress into pulmonary fibrosis or bronchiectasis.

Other lung conditions:

  • Recovery from lung transplant – after a single or double lung transplant, pulmonary rehab is done to improve your physical strength and endurance. Preventing Infection and watching for symptoms of rejection are key during your recovery. .
  • Pulmonary hypertension – the blood vessels (pulmonary arteries) that carry blood from the heart to the lungs become hard and narrow. This causes pressure within the heart, leading to a decrease in gas exchange in the lungs. The heart has to work harder and over time weakens. Chest pain, shortness of breath, abnormal heart rhythm and heart failure can occur. Treatment may include medicines to open the pulmonary arteries and oxygen use. High pressure in these arteries is not shown with an arm blood pressure reading. It is diagnosed based on medical history, physical exam and results from tests and procedures. .
  • Diaphragm disorders – half or all of the diaphragm muscle does not work well due to nerve damage or unknown causes. You may hear this called diaphragm paralysis or eventration (thinning of the diaphragm muscle). Treatment may include chest wall muscle strengthening with breathing exercises (inspiratory muscle training), breathing retraining, surgery or phrenic nerve pacing where electrical impulses are applied to the diaphragm. .
  • Chest wall restriction – conditions, such as morbid obesity and scoliosis or side curve to the spine may prevent the lungs from fully expanding, causing shortness of breath. .
What causes COPD?
    • Well about 80-90% of the people diagnosed with COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) Smoked or lived with someone who smoked. The other 10-20% non-smokers who developed COPD probably from workplace chemical or dust exposure. Now some patients are more susceptible to the damaging effects of smoking than others. Is COPD hereditary (Passed from parent to child)? No. Unless everyone in the family are smokers then yes.
Why do I have COPD now?
 
    • People do not develop COPD overnight. COPD develops over decades of smoking and other exposures. Now add to this the other conditions like Congestive Heart Failure, Obstructive Sleep Apnea,Heart disease, Diabetes and Obesity. Any of these with COPD, its no wonder your short of breath.
What can I do the breath easier?
    • Quit Smoking. Talk to your doctor, Get advice from a friend or take quit smoking medication or over-the-counter Nicotine replacement.
    • Take the medications your doctor recommends. If a Nebulizer or inhaler is ordered.
Please read the ebook below.
healthylungsusa.com/…/How-to-use-a-nebulizer.pdf
  • Pace yourself. BUT remain active. Consider Pulmonary rehab to assist with education, exercise and guidance under medical supervision.
  • Unfortunately the damage to your lungs is not reversible. But by taking action now you can maximize the areas of your lungs that are still working well.
Breathlessness, shortness of breath, difficulty with breathing. The medical term for shortness of breath is “dyspnea-Greek difficult+breathing.” Shortness of breath, or dyspnea, is an uncomfortable feeling or condition making it difficult to get enough air into your lungs.
  1. Shortness of breath can have a single cause, or it can have multiple causes. 
  2. Lungs– Asthma, COPD, Pneumonia, etc… 
  3. Heart-Irregular heart beat, low or high blood pressure, etc… 
  4. Blood- anemia and blood clots
  5. Mind- Stress, anxiety and depression.
  6. Body- Overweight, deconditioning and malnutrition.
  7. Medications- using medications for correct purpose, over-use of medications and side effects of other prescribed medications. 
  • Asthma
  • COPD flare-up or exacerbation
  • allergic reaction (such as from a bee sting)
  • carbon monoxide poisoning
  • heart attack
  • low blood pressure
  • pneumonia
  • anemia (low red blood cell count)
  • upper airway obstruction (throat blockage)
  • Congestive heart failure
  • abnormal heartbeat
  • choking
  • Guillain-Barré Syndrome
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Blood clot in lungs
  • asthma
  • COPD
  • heart function that is abnormal
  • obesity
  • lung cancer
  • pleurisy
  • pulmonary edema
  • pulmonary fibrosis and other interstitial lung diseases
  • pulmonary hypertension
  • sarcoidosis
  • etc…
1. Pursed-lip breathing
This is a simple way to control shortness of breath. It helps quickly slow your pace of breathing, which makes each breath deeper and more effective.
It also helps release air that’s trapped in your lungs. It can be used any time you’re experiencing shortness of breath, especially during the difficult part of an activity, such as bending, lifting objects, or climbing stairs.
To perform pursed-lip breathing:
1. Relax your neck and shoulder muscles.
2. Slowly breath in through your nose for two counts”Smell the flowers”, keeping your mouth closed.
3. Purse your lips as if you’re about to whistle.
4. Breath out slowly and gently through your pursed lips to the count of four.”Blow out the candles”

  •  Sitting forward
    Resting while sitting can help relax your body and make breathing easier.
    1. Sit in a chair with your feet flat on the floor, leaning your chest slightly forward.
    2. Gently rest your elbows on your knees or hold your chin with your hands. Remember to keep your neck and shoulder muscles relaxed.

  • Sitting forward supported by a table.
    If you have both a chair and table to use, you may find this to be a slightly more comfortable sitting position in which to catch your breath.
    1. Sit in a chair with your feet flat on the floor, facing a table.
    2. Lean your chest slightly forward and rest your arms on the table.
    3. Rest your head on your forearms or on a pillow.

  •  Standing with supported back
    Standing can also help relax your body and airways.
    1. Stand near a wall, facing away, and rest your hips on the wall.
    2. Keep your feet shoulder width apart, and rest your hands on your thighs.
    3. With your shoulders relaxed, lean slightly forward, and dangle your arms in front of you.

    Standing with supported arms
    1. Stand near a table or other flat, sturdy piece of furniture that’s just below the height of your shoulder.
    2. Rest your elbows or hands on the piece of furniture, keeping your neck relaxed.
    3. Rest your head on your forearms and relax your shoulders.
    6. Sleeping in a relaxed position

  • Many people experience shortness of breath while they sleep. This can lead to waking up frequently, which can diminish the quality and duration of your sleep.
    Try lying on your side with a pillow between your legs and your head elevated by pillows, keeping your back straight. Or lie on your back with your head elevated and your knees bent, with a pillow under your knees.
    Both of these positions help your body and airways relax, making breathing easier. Have your doctor assess you for sleep apnea, and use a CPAP machine if recommended.

  •  Diaphragmatic breathing
    Diaphragmatic breathing can also help your shortness of breath. To try this breathing style:
    1. Sit in a chair with bent knees and relaxed shoulders, head, and neck.
    2. Place your hand on your belly.
    3. Breathe in slowly through your nose. You should feel your belly moving under your hand.
    4. As you exhale, tighten your muscles. You should feel your belly fall inward. Breathe out through your mouth with pursed lips.
    5. Put more emphasis on the exhale than the inhale. Keep exhaling for longer than usual before slowly inhaling again.
    6. Repeat for about five minutes.

  • Using a fan.
     Pointing a small handheld fan toward your face can help your symptoms.

  • Drinking coffee
    A study indicates caffeine relaxes the muscles in the airways of people with asthma. This can improve lung function for up to four hours. Now don't drink all day you could get dehydrated and/or increase heart rate.
Call or visit your doctor when your usual activity causes unexpected shortness of breath. Breathing difficulty should be checked by a doctor if it:
  • comes on suddenly and isn't relieved with rest not relieved with usual treatment options i.e. Nebulizers, inhalers and oxygen
  • interferes with your daily activities
  • Fever of 100.5º F (38º C)
  • If you cough up blood
  • Feeling your heart beat rapidly, or have palpitations
  • Any new rashes on your skin
  • Any unusual swelling in your feet and legs
  • Weight gain of greater than 3 to 5 pounds in 1 week.
Shortness of breath that does not decrease with treatment or that is combined with other symptoms like chest pain needs urgent evaluation. This includes a possible emergency room visit
It can usually be controlled by:
  • medication
  • breathing techniques
  • exercise
  • supplemental oxygen
Other things you can do to prevent and control shortness of breath include:
  • pacing yourself
  • try to not hold your breath
  • using the pursed lips breathing technique
  • sitting in front of a fan, so it blows on your face
  • asking your doctor about pulmonary rehab
  • losing weight if you are overweight
  • avoiding exertions at elevations above 5,000 feet, unless trained
  • avoiding triggers that worsen asthma
  • avoiding exposure to pollutantsin the air, indoors and outdoors
  • quitting smoking, even if you’ve smoked for a long time (It reduces your risk for lung and heart disease.)
  • getting a routine health checkup
  • asking your doctor about your shortness of breath
  • continuing medications as prescribed
  • following an action plan developed with your doctor
  • ensuring your oxygen supply is adequate and your equipment works properly, if you rely on supplemental oxygen

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Disclaimer: “HealthyLungsUSA.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, as well as other affiliate programs. An affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com and other affiliate networks. By the way this does not in any way increase the cost to the consumer or buyer.”